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    The description :menu skip to content home blog projects work contact groundwork for new features in openstreetmap 2 replies last summer i finished a large refactoring , and thought it would be nice to change tack, an...

    This report updates in 20-Jun-2018

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menu skip to content home blog projects work contact groundwork for new features in openstreetmap 2 replies last summer i finished a large refactoring , and thought it would be nice to change tack, and so i decided to try to push through a new feature as my next project. refactoring is worthwhile, but it has a long-term pay-off. on the other hand, new features show progress to a wider audience, and so new features are another avenue to getting people interested and involved in development. i picked an old google summer of code project that hadn’t really been wrapped up, and immediately spotted a bunch of changes that would be needed to make it easier for others to help review it. long story short, it needed a lot more work than anyone realised and it’s taken me a few months to get it ready. i’ve learned a few lessons about gsoc projects along the way, but that’s a story for another time. i want to keep going with the refactoring, since a better codebase leads to happier developers and eventually to better features. but it’s worthwhile having some sort of a goal, otherwise it’s hard to decide what’s important to refactor, and to avoid getting lost in the weeds. there have been discussions in the past about adding some form of groups to openstreetmap, and it’s a topic that keeps on coming up. but i know that if anyone tried implementing groups on top of our current codebase, it would be impossible to maintain, and it’s far too big a challenge for a self-contained project like gsoc. so what things do i think would make it easier to implement groups? the most obvious piece of groundwork is a proper authorisation framework . without that, deciding who can view messages in or add members to each group would be gnarly. i also don’t want to add many more new features to the site with our “default allow” permissions – it’s too easy to get that wrong, particularly adding something substantial and complex like groups. i had a stab at adding the authorisation framework a few weeks ago, but quickly realised some more groundwork would help. we can make life easier for defining the permissions if we use standard rails resource routing in more places. however, that involves refactoring controller methods and renaming various files. that refactoring becomes easier if we use standard rails link helpers , and if we use shortened internationalization lookups . so there’s some more groundwork to do before the groundwork before the groundwork… share this: twitter pinterest flattr google facebook email this entry was posted in general and tagged development , openstreetmap , rails , refactoring on april 11, 2018 by andy . factory refactoring – done! after over 50 pull requests spread over the last 9 months, i’ve finally finished refactoring the openstreetmap-website test suite to use factories instead of fixtures. time for a celebration! as i’ve discussed in previous posts , the openstreetmap-website codebase powers the main openstreetmap website and the map editing api. the test suite has traditionally only used fixtures , where all test data was preloaded into the database and the same data used for every test. one drawback of this approach is that any change to the fixtures can have knock-on effects on other tests. for example, adding another diary entry to the fixtures could break a different test which expects a particular number of diary entries to be found by a search query. there are also more subtle problems, including the lack of clear intent in the tests. when you read a test that asserts that a given node or way is found, it was often not clear which attributes of the fixture were important – perhaps that node belonged to a particular changeset, or had a particular timestamp, or was in a particular location, or a mixture of other attributes. figuring out these hidden intents for each test was often a major source of the refactoring effort – and there’s 1080 tests in the suite, with more than 325,000 total assertions! changing to factories has made the tests independent of each other. now every test starts with a blank database, and only the objects that are needed are created, using the factories. this means that tests can more easily create a particular database record for the test at hand, without interfering with other tests. the intent of the test is often clearer too, since creating objects from factories happens in the test itself and are therefore explicit about what attributes are the important ones. an example of the benefits of factories was when i fixed a bug around encoding of diary entry titles in our rss feeds. i easily created a diary entry with a specific and unusual title, without interfering with any other tests or having to create yet another fixture. def test_rss_character_escaping create(:diary_entry, :title => "<script>") get :rss, :format => :rss assert_match "<title>&lt;script&gt;</title>", response.body end all in all, this took much, much longer than i was expecting! looking back , i feel i might have picked a different task , but i’m glad that it’s all done now. i’m certainly glad that i won’t have to do it all again! moving on, it’s now easier for me and the other developers to write robust tests, and this will help us implement new features more quickly. big thanks go to tom hughes for reviewing all 51 individual pull requests! thanks also to everyone who lent me their encouragement. so the big question is – what will i work on next? share this: twitter pinterest flattr google facebook email this entry was posted in general and tagged development , openstreetmap , rails , refactoring , tests on june 1, 2017 by andy . steady progress on the openstreetmap website time for a short status update on my work on the openstreetmap-website codebase . it’s been a few months since i started refactoring the tests and the work rumbles on. a few of my recent coding opportunities have been taken up with other projects, including the blogs aggregator , the 2017 budget for the osmf operations working group (owg), and the new owg website . with the fixtures refactoring i’ve already tackled the low-hanging fruit. so now i’m forced to tackle the big one – converting the users fixtures. the user model is unsurprisingly used in most tests for the website, so the conversion is quite time-consuming and i’ve had to break this down into multiple stages. however, when this bit of the work is complete most future pull requests on other topics can be submitted without having to use any fixtures at all. the nodes/ways/relations tests will then be the main thing remaining for conversion, but since the code that deals with those changes infrequently, it’s best to work on the user factories first. as i’ve been working on replacing the fixtures, i’ve come across a bunch of other things i want to change . but before tackling all that i’m going to mix it around a bit. my goal is to alternate between the work i think is the most important, and also helping other developers with their own work. we have around 40 outstanding pull requests and some need a hand to complete. there are plenty of straightforward coding fixes among the 250 open issues that i can work on too. i hope that if more of the issues and particularly the pull requests are completed, this will motivate some more people to get involved in development. if you have any thoughts on what i should be prioritising – particularly if you’ve got an outstanding pull request of your own – then let me know in the comments! share this: twitter pinterest flattr google facebook email this entry was posted in general and tagged development , openstreetmap , rails , refactoring on february 21, 2017 by andy . upgrading the openstreetmap blogs aggregator one of my projects over the winter has been upgrading the blogs.openstreetmap.org feed aggregator. this site collects openstreetmap-themed posts from a large number of different blogs and shows them all in one place. the old version of the

URL analysis for blog.gravitystorm.co.uk


https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/2007/01/07/osm-on-my-gps/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/2016/01/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/category/general/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/tag/chef/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/2010/01/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/tag/openstreetmap/page/4/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/tag/vector/feed/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/2014/07/07/openstreetmap-carto-workshop/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/tag/culture/
https://blog.gravitystorm.co.uk/2008/11/21/replacement-garmin-etrex-bike-clip/

Whois Information


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Error for "gravitystorm.co.uk".

the WHOIS query quota for 2600:3c03:0000:0000:f03c:91ff:feae:779d has been exceeded
and will be replenished in 192 seconds

WHOIS lookup made at 21:59:15 11-Jul-2017

--
This WHOIS information is provided for free by Nominet UK the central registry
for .uk domain names. This information and the .uk WHOIS are:

Copyright Nominet UK 1996 - 2017.

You may not access the .uk WHOIS or use any data from it except as permitted
by the terms of use available in full at http://www.nominet.uk/whoisterms,
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or hiding any or all of this notice and (C) exceeding query rate or volume
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  REFERRER http://www.nominet.org.uk

  REGISTRAR Nominet UK

SERVERS

  SERVER co.uk.whois-servers.net

  ARGS gravitystorm.co.uk

  PORT 43

  TYPE domain

DISCLAIMER
This WHOIS information is provided for free by Nominet UK the central registry
for .uk domain names. This information and the .uk WHOIS are:
Copyright Nominet UK 1996 - 2017.
You may not access the .uk WHOIS or use any data from it except as permitted
by the terms of use available in full at http://www.nominet.uk/whoisterms,
which includes restrictions on: (A) use of the data for advertising, or its
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or hiding any or all of this notice and (C) exceeding query rate or volume
limits. The data is provided on an 'as-is' basis and may lag behind the
register. Access may be withdrawn or restricted at any time.

  REGISTERED no

DOMAIN

  NAME gravitystorm.co.uk

NSERVER

  NS2.KRYSTAL.CO.UK 139.162.230.184

  NS1.KRYSTAL.CO.UK 77.72.0.11

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